Che Lingo

The Sweet Spot


Che Lingo might be the hardest working person in U.K. rap. You probably know this if you’ve seen him rousing a crowd to the point of madness in a sweaty London venue, or if you’ve heard the breakneck pace of his thoughts flow on simmering loosies like 2017’s “Zuko.”

In 2017, singles “Zuko” and “Black Girl Magic” proved that the south London wordsmith isn’t finished levelling up yet. The empowering, downtempo jam “Black Girl Magic” in particular is his best-performing single to date, with almost half a million YouTube plays for the sumptuously shot video, and support from Complex and BBC Radio 1. The song, he explains, is an anthem inspired by his mum, nan, and little sister.

The song forms part of his upcoming EP Charisma, his most creatively ambitious release to date. The EP finds him returning to a clean hip-hop style of rap over smooth 808s, and telling the story of how his unapologetic self-belief has pushed him to where he is today, and how it can do the same for others. On “Same Energy,” he muses on independence and fake friends over rolling trap drums, while “Metal and Rocks” harks back to his harder, darker early bangers, with conscious bars that reflect on institutional racism and materialism.

The Sweet Spot


Che Lingo might be the hardest working person in U.K. rap. You probably know this if you’ve seen him rousing a crowd to the point of madness in a sweaty London venue, or if you’ve heard the breakneck pace of his thoughts flow on simmering loosies like 2017’s “Zuko.”

In 2017, singles “Zuko” and “Black Girl Magic” proved that the south London wordsmith isn’t finished levelling up yet. The empowering, downtempo jam “Black Girl Magic” in particular is his best-performing single to date, with almost half a million YouTube plays for the sumptuously shot video, and support from Complex and BBC Radio 1. The song, he explains, is an anthem inspired by his mum, nan, and little sister.

The song forms part of his upcoming EP Charisma, his most creatively ambitious release to date. The EP finds him returning to a clean hip-hop style of rap over smooth 808s, and telling the story of how his unapologetic self-belief has pushed him to where he is today, and how it can do the same for others. On “Same Energy,” he muses on independence and fake friends over rolling trap drums, while “Metal and Rocks” harks back to his harder, darker early bangers, with conscious bars that reflect on institutional racism and materialism.

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